The Latest: Bosnian war crime suspect eager for deportationDecember 7, 2017 11:03pm

CLEVELAND (AP) — The Latest on an Ohio man accused of lying about his role in Bosnian war crimes (all times local):

6 p.m.

An Ohio man who was accused of hiding his role in a 1995 Serbian massacre of 8,000 Muslim Bosnians and pleaded guilty to a U.S. immigration fraud charge is looking forward to being deported.

A federal public defender says Oliver Dragic (DRAH'-gich) is pleased with the outcome of his case and is looking forward to re-establishing life with his mother in Bosnia.

Dragic was arrested after a three-count federal indictment last year. He pleaded guilty Thursday to possessing and using fraudulently obtained immigration documents.

Dragic lived in Barberton, in suburban Akron. U.S. District Judge Dan Aaron Polster sentenced Dragic to time already served since his 2016 arrest and ordered him deported.

Prosecutors say Dragic made false statements on forms about his role in ethnic cleansing in Bosnia while applying for refugee status in the U.S.

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5 p.m.

The government says an Ohio man has pleaded guilty to an immigration fraud charge after he was accused of hiding his role in a 1995 Serbian massacre of more than 8,000 Muslim Bosnians.

Oliver Dragic (DRAH'-gich) was arrested after a three-count federal indictment last year.

Mike Tobin, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney's Office in Cleveland, says Dragic pleaded guilty Thursday to possessing and using fraudulently obtained immigration documents.

U.S. District Judge Dan Aaron Polster sentenced Dragic to time already served since his 2016 arrest and ordered him deported.

A message left with Dragic's public defender wasn't immediately returned.

Prosecutors say Dragic, of Barberton in suburban Akron, made false statements on forms about his role in ethnic cleansing in Bosnia while applying for refugee status in the U.S.

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10 a.m.

A change of plea hearing is scheduled for an Ohio man accused of hiding the fact that he had been in a special police unit in Bosnia and took part in the Serb massacre of more than 8,000 Muslim Bosnians during the 1995 genocide.

The U.S. government accused Oliver Dragic (DRAH'-gich) of immigration fraud in a three-count federal indictment last year.

U.S. District Judge Dan Aaron Polster scheduled the plea hearing for Thursday afternoon. A change of plea hearing is typically held when a defendant plans to plead guilty.

Darin Thompson, Dragic's public defender, has declined to comment.

Prosecutors say Dragic, of Barberton in suburban Akron, made false statements on forms about his role in ethnic cleansing in Bosnia while applying for refugee status in the U.S.

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